Pioneer Profiles : H



Haines

Mr. Haines in 1885, as part of Haines & Gridley, purported he was one of the leading photographers in Calgary. The firms Mona Gallery was located on Atlantic avenue, opposite the CPR station.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Calgary, Her Industries & Resources, 1885.

Haldimand, A.W.

Mr. Haldimand, a pharmacist arrived in 1885 when he succeeded Mr. Alexander Macdonald, Manager of Medical Hall. He was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1885.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Calgary, Her Industries & Resources March, 1885.

Haldorson, Johann

Johann Haldorson and Haldora Gunnarsdottir emigrated in 1888 with five sons from Argyle, Manitoba. Mr. Haldorson died in 1892.

2004 Addendum. Ref: The Crag & Canpon, Vol. 17, Banff, Alta.

Hall, Harry Hans

Harry Hall came to the Gladys district in the 1880s and homesteaded the SW 1/4 of Sec.20-20-27-W4M. He moved to High River in 1916 and died at Gleichen.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Gladys-Dinton through the years.

Halliday, James

James Halliday and his wife came from Scotland to Lethbridge in 1881. Christina died in 1942 and William in 1901.

 

Halliday, W.J.

Mr. Halliday was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1889.

2004 Addendum.

Halpin, Charles Bernard

Charles Halpin came to Calgary in connection with C.P.R., in 1884, remaining until 1887. Charles was born in 1864 at London, Ontario. He was married in 1906 to Katherine Bayne McKeller, who was born at Blyth, Ontario. They had ten children. Charles farmed for awhile in Ontario, then moved west to Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 1882. He returned to Portage La Prairie, to publish a newspaper for thirteen years, then returned to Calgary to establish and publish the Albertan. He established the first newspaper Life in Banff, Alberta. Later he moved to Lacombe and purchased and published the Western Globe.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: The Calgary Herald, July 08, 1950.

Hames, Rev. Arthur B.

Reverend Hames was a Methodist minister at Fort Macleod from 1889 to 1892, then returned to Manitoba. His son, William Arthur Wesley was Town Clerk, in Bassano, in 1912.

 

Hamilton, Charles Edward

Charles Hamilton, born September 23, 1863, arrived west of the Great Lakes in June, 1880. He later walked into Calgary before the CPR was constructed in 1883. He lived between Calgary and Field Alberta.

2004 Addendum.

Hamilton, David

David Hamilton was at Calgary in 1875 and carried on a business as a blacksmith for a number of years in this district.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Calgary, Her Industries & Resources, 1885.

Hamilton, Frank & Sarah

Frank Hamilton married to Sarah McDougal had four children who all came to the DeWinton district in 1883 and he went into partnership with his brother Samuel. In 1884 the partnership dissolved and he and his family moved to Calgary where he became active in the real estate business.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Sodbusting to Subdivision.

Hamilton, Gavin

Gavin Hamilton, a Scotsman, was the first settler in the Westerdale District when he filed on a homestead on SE 1/4 of Sec.28-32-3-W5M in 1880. When he completed a log house on his property he had Mrs. Hamilton, sons, daughter and son-in-law come west. He established the first post office in the area and had a small store. He was a land surveyor and in that capacity helped others identify land location stakes for settlers. He later left the district to move to Calgary.

2004 Addendum. Ref: A Trail Grows Dim, Westerdale Willing Workers.

Hamilton, George

George Hamilton and his brothers, settled in Calgary in 1885. He was born in 1829 at Woodstock, N.B. and died at Calgary, in 1897. He was unmarried. George was one of five Hamilton brothers who left New Brunswick about 1865, rounded Cape Horn, working their way to California and then to the Caribou country of B.C., where John drove a stage and the other four mined for gold.

 

Hamilton, James

James Hamilton came west from Ontario as a hired hand to Tom Brown in 1886. He married Miss Dorland near Lethbridge, and worked for the Brown Ranch near Cardston. He left the Brown Ranch about 1901 or 1902 and worked for Col. Mackie, owner of Milk River Ranching Company. He died at Lethbridge.

2004 Addendum.

Hamilton, John Harper

John Hamilton operated a livery stable in Calgary, in 1885. He was born in 1848, at Woodstock N.B. and died in Calgary in 1933. He was unmarried. John was one of five brothers who left New Brunswick about 1865, and travelled with his brother George before arriving in Calgary. He drove a stage between Calgary and Fort Macleod.

 

Hamilton, Robert

Robert Hamilton, homesteaded in the Okotoks district in 1884. Robert was born in New Brunswick and died in 1903, at Okotoks. He married Matilda Colvin (nee Fiske), who was born at Guelph, Ontario and died in 1915 at Calgary. They had five children. Robert travelled west to California with his brothers, then to the Cariboo in search of gold.

 

Hamilton, Samuel

Samuel Hamilton came to Calgary in 1881 and homesteaded on NE 1/4 of Sec.27-21-1-W5M located some two miles southwest of DeWinton. He was the first settler in that area and lived on the farm until 1914. He died a bachelor in 1915.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Sodbusting to Subdivision.

Hamilton, Thomas

(see longer profile)

ee Thomas Hamilton and Jane came to High River, in 1889, with a family of ten children, from Fitzroy, Ontario. He died in 1901. The family homesteaded a mile east of the town limits. Older members of the family obtained work in the townsite or on neighboring farms. Thomas and seven of his children, all met with untimely deaths. Mrs. Hamilton died at High River in 1919.

 

Hamilton, William

William Hamilton was at Calgary in 1886. He was born in Quebec in 1861 and died at Calgary in 1928. He was married to Isabella Babington, who was born at Kilwinning, Scotland and died in 1944, at Okotoks. They had four children.

 

Hamilton, William Allen

William Hamilton came to Fort Macleod in 1874. He was born in 1845 at Princeton, Missouri, U.S.A. and died at Calgary in 1941. He was married at St. Albert, N.W.T. in 1883 to Verni Mary (Marie) Dumont, who was born in 1861/3 at St. Boniface, Manitoba and died at Fort Macleod in 1913. Verni Mary was an adopted daughter of Gabriel Dumont. The Hamiltons had six children. After the Civil War he freighted, with oxen, out of Fort Benton to Fort Macleod in 1874. He was a scout with the NWMP in the 1885 Rebellion. He took a homestead and farmed and ranched. A few years after his wife's death, he moved from Fort Macleod to Calgary.

 

Hamilton, William Samuel

Samuel Hamilton came west and homesteaded W 1/2 10-22-2-W5th, at Red Deer Lake, in 1884. He was born in 1835 at Woodstock, N.B. and died in 1909 at Red Deer Lake. In 1867 he married Matilda Emery, in Woodstock. She was born in 1839 in Woodstock and died prior to 1884 at Woodstock. They had one son. Samuel was the son of Major Hamilton, a Governor of New Brunswick, 1835 to 1839.

 

Hammer, Josiah Austin and Elizabeth

Josiah and Elizabeth Hammer were the youngest married couple to come to Cardston in 1887. Josiah was born in Utah in 1855 and Elizabeth in 1858. Josiah married Elizabeth Thompson in 1877 and they had four children (one may have died in infancy). He was active in the community holding many offices on the Town Council. He was a member of the Town Council from its incorporation, in 1902, President of the local Agriculture Society, Director of the Agriculture Fair Association, a member of the High Council of the Church of Latter Day Saints and Bishop of the Ward at Cardston for thirteen years. In 1887 Elizabeth was an obstetrician and mid-wife. Josiah died May 18, 1922 and Elizabeth died on July 19, 1929.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: Chief Mountain Country Vol. #2.

Hammond, George

George Hammond was reported to be one of the men who took part in the Cypress hills Massacre 1865.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Leaning on the Wind p. 59.

Hanna, Louis Dale

Louis Hanna arrived or was born in Calgary in 1889.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files, Re: his daughter Doris B. Johnston.

Hansen, Ezra Alvin

Ezra Hansen and his father arrived from Logan, Utah to homestead in the Cardston area in 1890. They drove cattle and horses to the area. Later that year in September when he had prepared a house for his family, his wife Mary and three children joined him. He farmed/ranched on his homestead ten miles southeast of Cardston on the St. Marys River all of his life. He was instrumental in developing the first sawmill on Lees Creek. Ezra and Mary in total had four daughters and six sons, all of whom have made their home in Alberta. Ezra died on September 15, 1945.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hansen, Niels

Niels Hansen, a tailor, was born in 1832 in Brastoff, Denmark. He married Eva Leota Hochstrasser on March 14, 1886 at Logan, Utah. They came to Aetna, Alberta in 1890, near Cardston, by wagon. Their homestead farm and ranch was east of Cardston. He later became a Bishop of Aetna Ward until he died in January, 1950 at Cardston. He is buried at Weiser, Idaho.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hanson, Walter George

Walter Hanson, born in India, came to Manitoba, Canada in 1888 at the age of 18 years. In 1890 he moved to High River and then on to the coast in BC. In 1892 he returned to High River and bought a coal mine in partnership with Dan Riley and in 1894 he started his own ranch. In 1898 he participated in the Yukon gold rush. Returning to Highwood he built up his Chinook ranch in 1904 and raised fine horses and top Hereford cattle. He married Ruth Deane Freman in 1914. They retired to High River in 1946. Walter passed away in 1948 and Ruth in 1958.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Leaves from the Medicine Tree p. 120.

Harbison, Joseph

Jopseph Harbinson was born in Ireland and ranched at Botha, Alberta. He worked with his brother Jack, as noted above, at Innisfail in 1887.

 

Harbison, William John (Jack)

Jack and brother Joe were cattle ranchers, at Innisfail, in 1887. Jack was born in 1869, in Newry, Ireland and died in 1918 at Calgary. At the age of fifteen he left Ireland to join his father in Hamilton, Ontario. Brother Joe soon followed. The two brothers, worked on the railway to come west. In 1900, he married Christine Johnston, who died in 1902. His second marriage was in 1904 to Mary Elizabeth Wilson, who died in 1905. Jack married his third wife, Grace Hawkins, in 1906. In 1904, Jack and Joe herded cattle to Botha (it was a poor winter), Joe stayed but Jack moved on. Jack then homesteaded near Penhold. He was in a Hotel Partnership, at Innisfail, bought cattle, a hotel in Olds, car dealership and a farm.

 

Hardwick, Edmund Douglas

Mr. Hardwick arrived in Alberta in 1889, as a boy of 16. He was born at Littlehampton, England and died in Calgary, in 1968. On his arrival he worked on the Quorn Ranch for some time prior to starting his own ranching career. He first settled on the Little Bow, north of Lethbridge, with his partner A. Rogers, but following the latter's accidental death, he moved north to the Snake Valley. Here he established the Lazy H Ranch, which he ran successfully until poor health forced him into retirement, in 1942. He married Isabel Mitchell Millie, in 1914, at her home in Cupar, Fife, Scotland. She was born there in 1889 and died in Calgary, in 1978. They had two daughters, Helena (Mrs. Eric Douglass) and Evelyn (Mrs. George Calow). Helena lives in Edmonton, Evelyn is in Calgary. Of particular significance to the Old Timers and the Historical Story of Alberta is a hobby that Douglas Hardwick engaged in upon his retirement. He was determined to write a historical record of the pioneers of Southern Alberta. Upon his retirement he dedicated his efforts to this kind of work and was doing a remarkable job until his eyesight began to fail and he had to lay the work aside. He envisioned that his reports would be microfilmed so the story would be there for all to view in the future. His work has not gone unrewarded because the Glenbow Foundation has accepted all of his papers and are carrying on to finish the job he started.

Contributed by Evelyn (Hardwick) Calow.

 

Hardie, William Duncan Livingston

William Hardie and his family arrived in Lethbridge, in 1889. He was born in 1862, at Edinburgh, Scotland. William was married in 1885 to Margaret Jane Kirtley, who was born at Newcastle, England. They had five children. He was a mining engineer and Superintendent of the Alberta Railway and Cattle Co. for twenty years, retiring in 1909. He was Mayor of Lethbridge from 1913 to 1924 and later commissioner of finance and Public Safety.

 

Harford, Ben

Ben Harford, with Herman Samson, in partnership, bought a large herd of cattle, with his B4 brand and Samson's Bar XY, to the Little Bow in 1886, obtaining a large lease and ranching under the Bar XY brand. Ben was born in England and was unmarried. He later sold his interest to Herms, in 1895 and returned to England, to take over his father's banking interests, in Brighton, Sussex, England.

 

Hargrave, James

James Hargrave was at Medicine Hat in 1883. He was born in 1846 at Beechridge, Quebec and died in 1935 at Medicine Hat. He married Alexandra Helen Sissons, in 1935 in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. She was born in 1853, at Howard, Ontario and died in 1932 at Medicine Hat. They had eight children. James was a very capable worker for the Hudson's Bay and gained much business experience as well as respect for the Indians. Due to a depressed economy of the time, he left his position to go to Medicine Hat where he and his brother-in-law Dan Sissons, started a business to sell general merchandise and trade with the Indians. He established various successful enterprises at Medicine Hat. His wife was equally successful in managing the home and supporting her husband and family.

 

Harker, Ephriam

Ephriam Harker, born in Taylorville, Utah on December 28, 1854, came to the Cardston area on May 11, 1889 to establish a sheep ranch. In October of 1890 he and C.O. Card trailed 2200 sheep from Montana to Alberta. At one time, Ephriam herded as many as twenty thousand sheep. Ephriam was originally married to Alice Bennion. His second marriage was to Sarah Elizabeth Carter (born at Saint George, Utah) on March 25, 1889 in Utah prior to coming to Alberta. In 1902 Ephriam Harker and Heber S. Allen opened a flour mill on the banks of the St. Mary's River. The mill was damaged in the 1908 flood and it was moved to Cardston. Ephriam a lover of good horses took great delight in exhibiting his livestock at county fairs. He died on March 29, 1932 and is buried at Cardston. There were twelve children and four others died in infancy.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Harkley, David

David Harkley came to Pine Creek in 1885. He was married to Mary Fisk. He was a Teamster and later a Building Contractor.

 

Harkley, James

James Harkley was a Cabinet Maker who came to Calgary from Walkerton, Ontario in 1887 and operated a Stopping House. He and his wife had one daughter, Barbara.

 

Harkley, Joseph

Joseph Harkley was in Calgary, in 1885. He was born in 1865 at Walkerton, Ontario and died in 1945 at Calgary. He married Elizabeth Ann Douglas, in 1887 at Pine Creek, who was born in 1865 at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, and died at Calgary in 1918. They had ten children.

 

Harkness,

Mr. Harkness came with Col. Strange, to Calgary in 1884. He returned to Ontario in 1887 and came back to Calgary in 1917 and was in partnership practicing Law with Egbert and Harkness. He had one child.

 

Harkness, Charles W.S.

Charles Harkness filed a homestead at Gladys Ridge in 1884. He was Postmaster from 1890 to 1894 and named the Post Office after his wife, Gladys. He moved to Edmonton in 1894.

 

Harley, John Stewart

John Harley was in Calgary in 1883. He took part in the Riel Rebellion with the Steele Scouts. He was married to Mary Foster.

 

Harper, Arthur Edward

Arthur Harper came to Canada as a captain in the British Army in 1885. He joined the NWMP in 1885 and took part in the Riel Rebellion He was a sergeant at the Dry Fork detachment on Kootnai River and later at the St. Marys detachment until 1887. He took his discharge around 1888-89 and married Jessie Shaw who came west from Kentville, Nova Scotia in 1885. They ranched on St. Marys River for three years, moved to Innisfail, and eventually to California before to England where he died in 1901.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Harris, Charles Edward

Mr. Harris, travelled across country to Pincher Creek in 1882. He was born in 1847 at Aylesworth, Nova Scotia, and died in Halifax, N.S. in 1901. In 1879 at Annapolis Royal, N.S., he married Fanny Helen Hoyt, who was born in 1850 and died in 1930 at Halifax. They had four children. Charles was engaged in the Hardware and Ship Chandlery business, but as business was depressed, the possibilities of fortunes in the west came, when the railroad was completed. He was persuaded to become a manager in a cattle and horse ranch but he also invested in the venture. Leaving his wife and two children, in Nova Scotia, he travelled with the horses by ship, train and river steamer to Fort Benton and then by wagon to Pincher Creek. Later he was joined by his wife and they started the Chipman-Harris Ranch in the Calgary area, which was later known as the Robinson Ranch.

 

Harris, Charles F.

Charles Harris was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1890.

2004 Addendum.

Harris, Howell

Mr. Howell was a freighter and trader at Fort Benton. He built Fort Conrad for I.G. Baker Co., then he moved to High River, where he built a post and traded there. He also assisted in the building of Fort Standoff in the fall of 1872. After freighting around Fort Macleod and ranching in Montana, he came back in 1886 and ranched near Lethbridge. Many years later he returned to Montana. Howell Harris was born in 1846 at St. Louis, Missouri, and died at Fort Benton, Montana, in 1921. In 1883 he was married to Emma Babbage of Washington, D.C. They had no children.

 

Harris, Michael

Michael Harris and his family arrived in Calgary in 1885. He was born in 1837 at Perth, Ontario and died in 1917 at Edmonton. In 1873 at Lower Fort Garry, Manitoba he married Helen Reid Clark, who was born in 1851 at Sarnia, Ontario and died in 1930 at Calgary. They had six children. Michael was a civil engineer and was a member of the staff of the Dominion Land Titles Office, in Calgary.

 

Harrison, H. C.

Mr. Harrison was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge prior to December 31, 1890.

2004 Addendum.

Harrison, Walter J.

Walter Harrison filed for a homestead on the SW 1/4- 26-2-W5th, at Airdrie, in 1888.

 

Hart, Frank

Frank Hart was an American cowboy, who escaped to Alberta from Montana after he had shot a store owner in Birch Creek in 1886. He was considered a good hand, obtained a job and remained in Alberta.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Leaves from the Medicine Tree p. 263.

Harty, (Herlly) David

David Harty was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1886.

2004 Addendum.

Harvey, Marion Osborne

Marion Harvey, came to Calgary in 1888. She was born in 1873 in Essex, England and died at Calgary, in 1947. In 1893 she married William Morley Puncheon Jarvis, at Great Fails, Montana. He was a member of the NWMP in 1888. Marion was the daughter of John Harvey of Maple Creek, Saskatchewan.

 

Hastings, Patrick J.

Patrick Hastings was at Langdon, Alberta in 1884. He was born in Ireland in 1862 and died in 1923 at Edmonton. In 1886 at Limerick, Ireland he was married to Mary Ann Barry, who was born in 1867 at Limerick, Ireland and died in 1941 at Edmonton. There were no children.

 

Hatfield, Herbert Maynard

Mr. Hatfield came to Pincher Creek in 1886. He was born in England in 1855 and died in 1945. Mr. Hatfield ranched at Twin Butte and raised horses for the NWMP. He was unmarried. After his death the ranch was re-named Waterton Ranch.

 

Haultain, Frederick W.F.B.A., K.D., MLA.

Mr. Haultain came to Fort Macleod in 1884, where he practiced Law. He was born in 1857 at Woolich, England and died in 1942 at Montreal, Quebec. He was a bachelor and came to Canada as a boy, receiving his High school education in Montreal. He attended Collegiate Institute at Peterborough, Ontario and received his B.A. and L.L.B. at Toronto University. In 1882 he was called to the Ontario Bar. He was a member of the N.W. Council 1887-88. He formed the first executive committee of N.W.T. in 1891 and remained the leader to 1897, when he was called to form an executive council. Premier, Attorney General, Commissioner of Education, N.W.T. 1897 to 1905. From 1905-1912, he was a Member of the Saskatchewan Legislature. Appointed Justice of the Supreme Court of Sask., in 1912. Chief Justice of Court of Appeal in Sask., in 1912. He was Knighted in 1916. In 1917 became Chancellor of University of Saskatchewan.

 

Hawkes, Charles William

Charles Hawkes arrived in Calgary in 1886. He was born in 1870 at Stroud, England and died at Calgary in 1956. In 1896 at Calgary, he married Elizabeth Chaldecotte, who was born in 1864, in England and died in Calgary, in 1932. They had three children. Charles rode for the Military Colonization Co. and for the C.C.C, at the "76" location. He filed a homestead near the Carseland Bridge, which was known as the "Hawkes Nest". Due to the river flooding in 1897, they lost all of their possessions and moved to Calgary. He acquired a sandstone quarry and supplied sandstone for several buildings in the city that were being built at that time. In 1900 he homesteaded near Shepard. Gravel was obtainable on his property and was used to gravel roads in the area. The site was know as "Hawkes Gravel Pit".

 

Haworth, Dr. Charles W.J.

Dr. Haworth was born in 1865 and came to Calgary in 1887. After a stay in Calgary, he moved to Edmonton in 1890. He opened a veterinary practice and was a well known veterinary surgeon for over 50 years. Dr. Haworth and his wife Jessie had a family of seven children, two girls and five boys. The boys were Dr. George Haworth of Lacombe, Dr. David Haworth of Calgary, Leonard, R.E. and Harold.

 

Hawthorne, Archibald Courtice

Mr. Hawthorne arrived in Medicine Hat, in 1869 and married Charlotte Victoria Edwards in 1897. They had ten children. He was born at Peterborough, Ontario and died at Medicine Hat.

 

Hayden, Dr.

Dr. Hayden opened a drug store and office in Cochrane, Alberta in 1877.

2004 Addendum.

Hayes, Bayard Leveritt

Bayard Hays farmed four miles north of Okotoks, from 1887 to 1946. He was born in 1867 at Sussex, N.B. and died in 1956 at Okotoks. He was married to Jane Long and they had two children.

 

Hayes, Edwin Albert

Edwin Hayes arrived in Calgary in 1885. He was born in 1862 at Sussex, N.B. and died in 1948 at Okotoks. In 1900, at Calgary he married Adalia Ellen Thorp, who was born in Washington, U.S.A. and died in 1925 at Okotoks. In 1926, at Crossfield, he married Marjorie L. Mossop, who was born in 1902 at London, England. There were three children.

 

Hayes, Glennon Harry

Mr. Hayes, a shoemaker, came to the southern NWT in 1890.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files.

Hayes, John W.

John Hayes came to the Nose Creek area with the first settlers in 1883. He was with the construction crew of the C.P.R. when he came to Calgary. He joined Steele's Scouts and participated in the Rebellion. He was a prominent member of the Conservative Party and was one of the original members of the Southern Alberta Pioneers. He contributed to community and livestock development. John Hayes was a member of the First Methodist Church. He died at Banff in 1938.

 

Haynes, Mary

Mary Haynes was a sister of Canon W. Haynes and came to Gleichen in 1889 to work among the Indians, starting the first Indian school there. She was born in 1873 at Ashbourne, England and died at Gleichen in 1935. In 1896, she married Walter James Sr., who had come to work at the school. In 1900 Walter became Agency Clerk for the Indian Dept. In 1904 he resigned and founded a general store. In 1907 it became the Gleichen Trading Co. Ltd. Because of his knowledge of the language, he served as an interpreter for the Indians. Mr. and Mrs. James each had Indian names. They had four sons. One son, Walter, farmed in the area in later years.

 

Haynes, Rev. William Robinson

William Haynes, a missionary with the Anglican Church, came to serve the Blackfoot tribe at Gleichen in 1889. He was born in 1865, in Ashbourne, England and died in 1937 at the Blood Indian Reserve, in Cardston. He opened a boarding school for Indian boys where a Miss Brown, also a missionary came from Eastern Canada, was one of the first teachers. In 1891, at Gleichen, he married Elizabeth Edwards, who was born in Wales, in 1866 and died in 1944 at the Blood Indian Reserve, Cardston. They had one daughter, Gertrude Mary Margaret Robinson Haynes. In 1893 Canon Haynes went to the Blood Reserve to oversee the day school at Chief Red Crow's camp near Standoff. In 1894 he returned to the Blackfoot Reserve where in 1895 a new school for Indian boys was built of which Canon Haynes became principal until 1897 when he became principal of the Victoria Home for Indian children near Brocket on the Peigan Reserve.

Merged with 2004 Addendum.

Head, Jasper L.

Jasper Head came to the Cardston area in 1890. He was born in 1861 at Franklin, Idaho, U.S.A. He married Mary Thomas in 1886. Jasper homesteaded near Beazer, Alberta. The family resided at Milk River as well as Magrath. There were twelve children in the family.

 

Heald, William Herbert

William Heald homesteaded SW 1/4 of Sec.2-21-2-W5M located in the Pine Creek area in 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Heald and son Larry, moved to BC in 1903.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Our Foothills Bragg Creek, Kew and Millarville.

Healy, Ebineezer

Ebineezer Healy arrived in the Springbank area in 1887. He was born in Nova Scotia in 1845 and died in 1937 at Springbank. He was married to Sarah Pepper, who was born in 1849 in Ontario and died in 1901 at Springbank. Mr. Healy opened a cheese factory in 1889. There were six children in the Healy family.

 

Healy, Joe

Joe Healy; a Blood Indian was born in Montana. His mother and father were killed by hostile Pend O'reille Indians. Captain J.J. Healy rescued the baby and adopted him. He attended the white man's schools for eight years. Joe Healy was looked upon as one of the great leaders of the Blackfoot Confederacy and was a trusted scout. In his later years he was a picturesque figure in the Lethbridge Exhibition and Stampede. Joe and his wife had nine children. He came to Canada in 1880, was born in 1854 and died in 1936. He was in Southern Alberta in 1880.

 

Healy, John Jerome

John Healy came to the Fort Whoop Up area in 1869. John Healy and A.B. Hamilton established a trading post at the confluence of St. Mary's and Belly Rivers. Fort Whoop Up was a gathering point for all traders and an outpost of Fort Benton. The 'bargain of the day' for the Indians was one bottle of contraband whiskey - 'Fire Water' in return for one buffalo skin that could be sold in New York for six dollars.

 

Heap, Sam

Sam Heap came to Fort Macleod in 1889. He was born in 1862 in England and died in 1948 at Calgary. He married Harriet Shepard in 1897 at Macleod. She was born in 1862 and died in 1944 at Claresholm. Sam was a member of the NWMP. He had studied medicine in England and served in the hospital as Staff Sgt. He left the force and took over the Garnett ranch, later moving to the Ives ranch. He rejoined the force for a short time. In 1903 was appointed Postmaster at Fort Macleod. In 1910 established an Insurance and Real Estate office. There were two children: Ella M. and Constance.

 

Heath, Malcolm

Malcolm Heath along with others formed a partnership in 1888 and started to raise sheep in the Pincher Creek area.

2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 7.

Heaton, George

George Heaton came to Pincher Creek from Europe in 1887. In partnership with F. Tetley and Malcom Heath, he started raising sheep which they bought from Fred Morris in 1888. He was born in 1865 at Birmingham, England. He died in 1945 at Pincher Creek. He married Amy A. Miles in 1890 at Pincher Creek. Amy was born in 1866 in Ireland and died in 1951 at Pincher Creek. There were three children: Geoffrey H., Lorne M., George F.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 7.

Henday, Anthony

Anthony Henday came to North America in 1750. He was born on the Isle of Wight, England. Henday entered the service with the Hudson's Bay Co. in 1750 and in 1774 undertook a voyage of exploration into the Far West, reaching the Blackfoot Crossing. He wintered there and traded for furs, returning to York Factory in June 1775.

 

Henderson, Dr. Andrew

Dr. Henderson arrived in Calgary in 1883. His wife was Edith Jane. They had one son, Richard Gordon. Dr. Henderson was the first civilian doctor in Calgary. He was a member of the first Civic Committee, 4 January 1884.

 

Henderson, David

David Henderson came to Calgary in 1884 from his birth place in Ireland. He died at Victoria, B.C. in 1922. He married Sarah McLean, who was born on the Isle of Mull, Scotland and died at Victoria, B.C. in 1924. There were four children: Sarah, Marguerite, Emily and George.

 

Henderson, George

George Henderson arrived at Canmore in 1886 and came to Calgary in 1898. He was born at Winnipeg, Manitoba and died at Calgary in 1969. His wife was Marguerite. Their four children were: Harry, Ruth, Shirley and Georgina. George Henderson became water foreman for the City of Calgary, a position he held for forty years.

 

Henderson, John (Jack)

Jack Henderson arrived in the Lethbridge district in 1885. He worked as a carpenter for his brother, William Henderson, who had a contracting business. He was born in 1868 and was married to Maggie Scott. There were four children.

 

Henderson, T. A. and Jessie

Henderson, William

William Henderson arrived at Calgary in 1883. He was born in 1857 and died at Lethbridge, in 1909. He married Margaret Thompson in 1887. They had six children, Harold T., Margaret E., Adeline, William S., F.W. and Edna. He was a contractor for the railroad, builder and operator of the Lethbridge Hotel and was mayor of Lethbridge.

 

Henry, Arthur Henry

Arthur Henry, a harness maker, came to Fort Macleod in 1887.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files.

Henry, John Sullivan

John and Mary Sullivan came to Calgary in 1889. John was born at Charlottetown, P.E.I. in 1845 and died in 1921. Mary Reardon was born in 1848 at Charlottetown P.E.I. They were married there in 1866. Mary died at Calgary in 1917. They had twelve children.

 

Henry, Thomas Alexander

Thomas Henry came to High River, in 1882. He was born in 1867 at Alyth, Scotland and died in 1922 at High River. He married Jessie Scott in 1890 at High River. She was born in 1876 at Inverness, Scotland and died in 1953 at High River. They had three children: Marjory S., Thomas A., and Jessie. Thomas obtained employment as a teamster with the C.P.R. In 1883 he was at High River engaged in logging and building houses. He homesteaded, farmed and raised cattle on land on the Little Bow River. He retired in 1917 at High River.

 

Henry, William Shaw (Billie)

Billie Henry came to the High River area in 1885. He was born in 1868 in Scotland and died in 1972 at High River. He married Agnes Baird in 1910. She was born at Woodstock, Ontario and died in 1955. Billie was a well known rancher, pioneer cowboy and hotel man. He was also a well known figure in the sheep raising story of Alberta. Billie lived until he was 104 years old. There were no children.

 

Herald, Rev. James M.A.

Rev. Herald came to Medicine Hat in 1885. He was born in 1823 at Kerriemuir, Scotland and died in 1890 at Medicine Hat. His wife was Jane Barclay, who was born in 1826 and died in 1900 at Port Arthur, Ontario. James was a Presbyterian minister of St. John's Church and was a scholarly man, taking a very active part in the early church. Rev. Herald held church services in Medicine Hat from 1885 to 1890. There were nine children in the family. One daughter was Mrs. Jessie Ewart who died at Medicine Hat in 1957.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: Early History of Medicine Hat Country.

Herdman, Rev. James Chalmers

Rev. James Herdman came to Calgary in 1885 to assist the Rev. Angus Robertson in his field work for the Presbyterian Church. The area covered High River, Gleichen, and Canmore. In 1887 he became minister of Knox Presbyterian Church. With the rapid growth of Calgary, the small church had become inadequate and a second Church was built at the corner of Centre Street and 7th Avenue S.W. the site of the present York Hotel. Rev. Herdman opened Western Canada College, a school for young gentlemen on 15 Ave. and 4th Street S.W. It later moved to 17 Ave. and 6th Street S.W. the present site of Western Canada Collegiate Institute. Under Rev. Herdman's leadership the lay men and women turned their attention to the under-privileged and often misunderstood members of the early Chinese community. The result was the establishment of the Chinese Presbyterian Church (later the Chinese United Church) about 1901. Rev. Herdman left Calgary in 1902.

Researched by J. Davis

 

Herfoot, William Duncan

William Herfoot arrived in Calgary in 1881. His son Archibald Douglas was born July29, 1890 in Calgary.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files.

Herman, Mike

Mike Herman came to the Highwood and Red Deer River area in 1884. He was born in 1868 and died in 1928. Mike was one of the trail riders when Emerson and Lynch trailed cattle from south of the border in 1882. He acquired a holding in Coal Valley. He rode in the 1912 Calgary Stampede Parade. He was unmarried.

 

Herron, John

He came to the Fort Macleod area in 1875. He was born at Ottawa, Ontario in 1853 and died in 1936 at Pincher Creek. He married Ida Lake at Lindsay, Ontario in 1878. She was born in 1855 at Oakwood, Ontario and died at Pincher Creek, in 1934. John joined the NWMP in 1875 and took his discharge in 1878. He returned to Ottawa for a few years. In 1881 he returned to Pincher Creek and went into ranching. He was elected as a Member of Parliament in 1904 and again in 1908. There were three children in the family; Georgina, Carrie and Edith.

 

Hervey, Philip Charles Barnard

Philip Hervey, was born on November 25, 1859 in Dakjeeling, Bengal, India. A railway construction engineer, came he to Calgary in the 1880s from Ontario. He worked for the CPR, building the Crowsnest and Edmonton railway lines. He acted as head engineer constructing irrigation ditches in the Strathmore-Brooks area. In 1886 he purchased a section of land in the Red Deer Lake area from Arthur Peake. In 1912 he was Superintendent of National Parks of Western Canada. He was married to Penuel Isobel Lyons Mary Holcombe from England in Ontario on June 4, 1884. She was born in 1856 on the High Seas and died in 1934 at Calgary. They had three sons: Harcourt C., Gerald E., and Vivian A.A. Philip lived at Midnapore until his death in 1945.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: Sodbusting to Subdivision & The Fireguard Trail.

Heslip, Samuel

Mr. Heslip was a blacksmith by trade. He gradually moved westward with the railroad making steel spikes for the C.P.R. as far west as Anthracite, Alberta, in 1883-84. He settled in High River where he bought a blacksmith shop. He then opened a hardware business which he operated for ten years. He farmed in the Youngstown and Delia areas. Samuel died in 1929 at Kelowna, B.C. In 1877 he was married to Catherine Hurlburt, who was born in 1858 in Ontario and died in 1928 at Kelowna, B.C. There were eight children: Ethel, Frank, Augusta, Georgia, Jack, Clarence, Reginald and Earl.

 

Hetherington, Samuel

Samuel Hetherington was stationed at Calgary in 1884 with the NWMP. Samuel was born in England in 1860 and died at Calgary in 1941. He married Annie Story in 1896 at Fort Macleod. She was born in 1865 at Kempville, Ontario and died at Calgary in 1946. After his discharge he joined the C.P.R. in the construction. Samuel was a member of the Steele Scouts during the North West Rebellion. They had no family.

 

Hewson, John Arthur

John Hewson came to Fort Macleod in 1889 by stage coach. He was born at Limerick, Ireland in 1867 and died at Calgary in 1944. He was married to Emily Curtis in 1894 at Calgary. She was born in 1865 at Brantford, Ontario and died in 1945 at Calgary. John farmed in the Fort Macleod area for forty eight years. He moved to Calgary in 1934 and operated a chicken farm. There were five children: Mary, Millicent, William, Kathleen and George J.

 

Higginbotham, Edward Nathaniel

Edward Higginbotham arrived in Fort Macleod in 1885. He was born in 1866 at Guelph, Ontario and died in 1944. He married a Miss E. A. Chapman, a Nursing Supervisor at Galt Hospital. Their two children both died in infancy. Edward was a pioneer dry goods merchant in Lethbridge, also postmaster until 1916. He then accepted a position in the Attorney General's Department in Edmonton, Alberta.

 

Higinbotham, John David

John Higinbotham arrived at Lethbridge in 1884. He was born in 1864 and died in 1961. He married Margaret Anna Torance of Guelph in 1889; she died in 1937. John obtained his education at Guelph Academy and Collegiate Institute; after serving his Pharmacy apprenticeship he came west and established a drug store at Fort Macleod. Eighteen months later he moved to Lethbridge and opened a drug store there. He was postmaster in 1887 when the town name was changed to Lethbridge from Coalhurst. He was active in local affairs. There were six children in the family.

 

Hilane, Samuel Rowland

Samuel Hilane was born at Whitewater, near Brandon Manitoba, about 1859. He came to Alberta as a CPR contractor. He and Minnie McPhee from PEI, were the first couple to be married at the Church of The Redeemer in Calgary on August 30, 1884.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Celebrations 100th Anniversary of The Cathedral Church of The Redeemer.

Hill, Edward Roland

Edward Hill was born in 1855 in England and died at Red Deer, in 1926. He married Elizabeth Greenfield at Calgary. She was born in 1867 at Meaford, Ontario and died in 1925 at Red Deer. There were four children: Harriet, Jennie, Roland G., Edith. Mr. Hill was at Calgary in 1884.

 

Hilliard, Christopher

Mr. Hilliard arrived at Fort Kipp in 1882. He was born in 1859 at Derryhean, Ireland and died at Fort Macleod in 1939. He was married at Fort Macleod in 1899 to Corrine de Bellefoille, who was born in 1879 at Montreal and was a niece of Sir John A Macdonald and a cousin of Col. Sam Steele. There were seven children. Christopher Hilliard served in the NWMP and received the Long Service Medal at Fort Macleod in 1936 for having served at Fort Macleod, Fort Walsh, Stand Off, and during the 1885 Rebellion.

 

Hillier, E. Frederick

Frederick Hillier came from England to the Blood Indian Reserve in 1888. Born in England, he died in 1905. He married, Alice Sandfield, who was born in 1881 at Chester, England and died in 1953. E.F. Hillier taught school at the Anglican Mission at Red Crow's camp on the Blood Reserve, south of Stand Off. He later took over the Church of England school for the Blood Indians. They had two children: Lila and Edwin.

 

Hills, E.I. F. (Ted)

Ted Hills came to the High River area in 1885. He married Nora Griffin. Ted was born in Littlehampton, England. On his arrival in Alberta he worked for Skrine and freighted. When the Quorn ranch ceased operation he obtained a place of his own on the Middle Highwood River, 'Echo Glen Ranch'. In 1908 he disposed of his interests and returned to England.

 

Hilton, Frank.

Frank Hilton was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1886.

2004 Addendum.

Hinde, William

William Hinde was born 25 January 1869 at Portsmouth, England and died in 1939 at Calgary. He came to Canada in 1887, first working on ranches at Kelowna, B.C. In 1889 he purchased a homestead on land joining the Bow River at Shepard. He married Elizabeth Atherton in 1906. She was born in 1881 at Portsmouth, England and died in 1942 at Calgary. They had seven children: William G., Joseph E., Mary J., George F., Anges E., Margaret M., and John K. In 1903 William became a postmaster for the Shepard area N.W.T. Municipal Affairs Department. When Alberta became a province in 1905 he worked for the Local Improvement District becoming Secretary Treasurer for the Municipal District of Shepard #220, a position he held till he retired in 1939. President of Southern Alberta Pioneers in 1933.

Information from J.G. Hinde.

 

Hinman, Frank

Frank Hinman, born in 1871, came to the Cardston area from Utah in July 1889, travelling with his mother Rhoda and sister Nellie, where they joined his father Morgan Hinman, who settled in the Cardston area in 1887. The three of them drove a team with a wagon loaded with furniture together with a herd of cattle. It took six weeks to make the trip from Utah to Cardston. Frank married Sarah Hockstraueser in 1891, had two daughters and died in 1894 in Cardston.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hinman, Henry Lyman

Henry Hinman (born in the United States in 1837) with his brother Morgan and his son Lewis, arrived in Cardston in October, 1887. He and his brother Morgan, both millwrights and carpenters, helped build many of the first homes consisting of log houses with sod roofs in Cardston. In June of 1890, Henry's wife, Mary Jane White, married in 1874, and their family of six children arrived in Cardston. Henry and his brother Morgan and their two sons, homesteaded Sec.34-2-25-W4M. Henry was one of the first councilmen, the first Notary Public, and the first Justice of the Peace in the village of Cardston. He died 27 January, 1921. In total, there were nine children in the family.

Merged 2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hinman, Morgan Lewis

Morgan Hinman, born October 7, 1831 at Stockbridge, Mass., came to the Cardston area with his brother, Henry and settled in the locality known as Lees Creek. In 1887 his wife, Rhoda, and 18 year old son, Frank and 12 year old daughter, Nellie, joined him in 1889. Morgan, a skilled carpenter, helped build many of the first homes in Cardston. In 1890 he was involved in construction of the NWMP police barracks at Fort Macleod. He and his brother, and their two sons, homesteaded Sec.34-2-25-W4M. He died on July 3, 1891.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hinoston, John

John Hinoston was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1889.

2004 Addendum.

Hinton, Frank

Frank and his wife Sarah and their two daughters, Ada Louise and Jessie came from Putney, England to Pincher Creek, arriving May 3, 1887. Tom Hinton, brother of Frank, had a lumber yard and Frank and his family joined him. They had a son Dick and their daughter Ada Louise married Arthur Charles Kemmis, the first lawyer in Pincher Creek, in 1902. Ada and Arthur had two children, Helen Aileen and Sibyl Olphert. Frank Hinton died in 1908, Sarah in 1935 at the age of 83 years.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Prairie Grass to Mountain Pass.

Hinton, Thomas Henry

Thomas Hinton came to the Pincher Creek in 1882. He was born in 1859 in England and died in 1937 at Pincher Creek. He married Lucy Smart, who was born in England in 1864 and died there in 1914. They had four children: Jessie W., Henry, Evelyn and Charles E.

 

Hoad, Mrs. Nelson

Mrs. Hoad was the first matron of the first hospital in Calgary. It was located in an unoccupied corner residence on Ninth Avenue West and Seventh Street in 1890. The hospital was established as the typhoid epidemic threatened local residents.

2004 Addendum. Ref: The Calgary Daily Herald, Nov. 18, 1933.

Hodder, Eli J.

Eli Hodder came west to Fort Macleod in 1882. He was born in 1855 and died in 1904. He was married to Alma J. Forbes in 1886 at Lethbridge. She was born at Toronto, Ontario in 1859 and died in 1942. Eli was a Corporal in the NWMP at Fort Macleod. In 1885 he was posted to Lethbridge; the following year he left the force to become manager of a meat market. Their only child died in infancy.

 

Hodgson, George

George Hodgson, son of George and Mary (Roland) Hodgson, was born July 18, 1846 at Fort Ile a là Crosse, Saskatchewan. In 1854 he travelled Alberta with his mother's people, however it was not until 1870 when he wed a native Albertan, Marie Madeleine Bruneau, daughter of Louie Bruneau and Angelé Dumont, that he took up residence in this area. George was a plainsman who spoke five languages. He worked for The Hudson Bay Company and made a career of hunting, trapping and trading. He was personally appointed farm instructor and interpreter for the Sarcee Reserve by Sir John A MacDonald, a position he held for thirty nine years. George and his wife Madeleine were held in respect by both native and non native peoples. Many of his descendants are still in the southern Alberta area.

Submitted by M Michaud

 

Hodgson, Thomas

Thomas Hodgson came to Medicine Hat in 1883 as an employee of the C.P.R. He died at Red Deer in 1950. He had holdings in the Balmoral district of Red Deer and was a noted horticulturist.

 

Hogg, Simon Jackson

Hogg came to Calgary in 1883. He was born in Ontario. He established a lumber business under the name of S.J. Hogg and Co. It was situated near the old C.P.R. station. He later moved to larger premises on Stephen Avenue. He was a Calgary town councillor in 1884 when the Town of Calgary was incorporated on November 17, 1884

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: The Calgary Herald, July 13, 1943.

Hogg, Solomon Moses

Soloman Hogg, a stockman, came to Medicine Hat in 1886.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files.

Hogge, James Alexander

James Hogge came to Calgary in 1885. Born at Inverness, P.Q. and died at Okotoks in 1950. He was married to Lillie 0. Currie, who was born in Quebec in 1880 and died at Okotoks in 1958. James homesteaded in the Rosebud district and then returned to Calgary, where he worked on the construction of the Langevin Bridge. In 1901 he purchased land in the Okotoks district where he raised Clydesdales. In 1896 he managed the Davisburg Agricultural Society. There were seven children in the family; Pearl, Lorne, Norman A., Albert J., Lillian, John W., Harvey L.

 

Hogge, Joseph

Joseph Hogge came to the Melrose area in 1885. Joseph was born at Trois Rivers , Quebec in 1861 and died in 1945. He was married to Catherine Stewart in 1892 at Davisburg, AB. Catherine was born in 1873 at Montreal, Quebec and died at Okotoks, Alberta in 1966. Catherine's family came to Canmore in 1883. Joseph raised thoroughbred cattle and horses in the Okotoks district. They had one son - Ernest J.

 

Holbroke, E.C.

Mr. E. Holbroke was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1889.

2004 Addendum.

Holgren, John

John Holgren was at Red Deer, Alberta in 1885 and homesteaded in the Balmoral district of Red Deer. He resided there until his death.

 

Holland.

Mr. Holland was a Beaver Creek polo player in 1888.

2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 10 12.

Hollies, John

John Hollies came to Fort Macleod in 1885. He was born at Birmingham, England in 1840 and died in Manitoba in 1912. He was married at Fort Macleod in 1888 to Elizabeth Dunbar who was born in 1860 in Ontario and died in 1957 in Calgary. The Dunbar family came to Fort Macleod in 1883. There were five children in John Hollies' family. John was with the NWMP in 1875. After his discharge he went into partnership with a man named Bevins. His homestead was on Hollies Coulee. Later he managed the Queen's Hotel at Fort Macleod and a Trading Post at Olsen's Creek in the Porcupine Hills. He then worked as a clerk at the Peigan Reserve.

 

Holloway, Mark

Mark Holloway came to Alberta in the 1870s from Montana.

2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 4 -5.

Holloway, Mart Vern

Mart Holloway came to Alberta in 1874. He was born in 1836 in London, England and died in 1917 at Livingstone. He was married to Elizabeth at Pincher Creek. She was born in 1843 and died in 1894 at Lundbreck. There were four children in the family. Mart Holloway was a prospector and a miner. Mart Holloway's mine was opened in 1880 by J.B. Stone, a practical engineer, sent by a syndicate represented by J.B. Smith of Fort Macleod. Mart was a prominent figure in the Lost Lemon Mine story.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 10 12.

Holmes, William Edward Guy

William Holmes was born in 1850 at Montreal, Quebec and died in 1915. He walked to Calgary from Regina, Saskatchewan in 1882. In 1886 he married Janet Douglass, she had come to Calgary in 1883 to visit her sister and remained here. She was born in 1866 at Quebec City and died in 1936 at Calgary. They had nine children. William worked at the Bar U Ranch, then freighted for the Hudson's Bay Company between Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta. His homestead was a mile and a half south of the High River Crossing. William was a Justice of the Peace in 1892.

 

Holt, D.G.

Mr. Holt was the editor of the Medicine Hat Times which preceded the Medicine Hat News from 1887-1889. In 1890, he went to Santa Monica and was in the newspaper business there.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Early History of Medicine Hat Country p. 38 - 40. Alberta Newspapers, 1880-1982: An Historical Directory, p. 172, 343.

Holt, John

Mr. and Mrs. Holt filed on a homestead two miles north of Gleichen siding after coming with the C.P.R. in 1883. He was born in Norway and married Miss Anderson. There was one boy and 3 girls, Gideon, Emma, Jane and Katherine. At the birth of the fifth child Mrs. Holt died and Mrs. Holt's mother came out from Norway to raise the children. Grandma Anderson was a graduate maternity nurse and was kept busy attending many births in the district before there was a Doctor in Gleichen.

 

Hood, Andrew

Andrew Hood came to Lethbridge in 1883. He was born in Nova Scotia in 1830 and died in 1909 at Lethbridge. He married Jessie Ann McKay who was born in 1861 in Nova Scotia and died in 1943 at Edmonton. There were two children in the family; Ethel and John Henry.

 

Hooley, Peter

Peter Hooley arrived at Canmore in 1888. Peter was born in 1855 at Manchester, England and died in 1929 at Revelstoke, B.C. He was married to M. Marie Stringfellow, who was born in 1860 at Bolton, England and died in 1938. There were five children in the family. Peter worked for the C.P.R. at Canmore and for a short period at Bankhead as a boilermaker, before moving to Donald, B.C. The family then moved to Revelstoke, B.C.

 

Hooper, Sydney

Sydney Hooper, born in England, was in Fort Kipp in 1884 when he moved to the site of the Hooper-Huckville Ranch which was known as the Fiddle Back Ranch.

2004 Addendum. Ref: The Forgotten Corner p. 17.

Hope, Joseph R.

Joseph Hope was born in 1858 at Cumberland, England and came to Calgary in 1885. He died at Red Deer Lake in 1935. He married Caroline Paling at Midnapore in 1893. She was born in 1869 at London, England and died in 1936 at Calgary. They had a family of six; Leonard F., Gladys, Hilda, Minnie, Richard J. and Gerald C. Joseph homesteaded the S.W. corner of the Red Deer Lake in 1886. He was a member of the first Fire Fighting force (Bucket Brigade) in Calgary. The farm is still operated by his son Richard J.

 

Horn, A.V.

Mr. A. V. Horn was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1889.

2004 Addendum.

Hornby, James Abel

James Hornby was born in Springfield, Ontario in 1861. Died in Calgary in 1944. He married Annie Isabel McRae in 1896. Miss McRae was one of the first telephone operators in Calgary. Mr. Hornby worked as a carpenter on many of the early buildings, such as, the Underwood Block, Victoria Hotel, etc. He was an Insurance Adjuster for a number of years. He was alderman for 15 years, and ran for mayor in 1905 against John Emerson and ran again for mayor in 1909 against H. R. Jamieson and lost again. James Abel Hornby was a valuable citizen and his contribution to the city is immeasurable.

 

Horton, Edith Lillian

(see longer profile)

Edith Horton, born November 19, 1866 in London, England, came to Canada in 1883. In 1883 she travelled west by train from Montreal to Medicine Hat, by sternwheeler to Lethbridge, on packhorses and wagons to Fort Macleod and by stagecoach to Calgary. In 1890 she married Harold Morton Henderson, who was a railroad worker and later an Anglican Minister, at Donald Station. They lived in many places in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Rev. Henderson was Rector of St. Barnabas Church in Calgary 1921-1929. They had four children, Cecil, Stanley, Ethel and Phillip. She died in 1945.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Gerald T. Weber, her grandson.

Houk, George

George Houk arrived in Southern Alberta in 1864. He was born in the United States in 1840 and died in 1928. His wife, a native Indian, was born in Montana. It is believed that he was one of the first traders in the area. He spoke the Indian language fluently. After his wife's death his interest in life declined. He had one son, George Presly, who was a baseball player and worked for the railroad in Montana in the off season. Mr. Hauk was at Lethbridge in 1875.

 

Houston, William

William Houston was recorded as a charter member of the Masonic Lodge Bow River No. 1, Calgary instituted in 1884.

2004 Addendum.

Howard, Joseph Robert & Robert Jr.

Joseph Howards family came to Canada from Tipperary, Ireland and settled in Ontario for a while. They moved to Morleyville in 1886, and about 1890 moved to Cochrane. Their one son, Robert married Louise Vizena in Pembroke, Ontario. They initially lived in Calgary, working at odd jobs, but moved to Cochrane where work was more available. Robert was a cabinet maker by trade and went into the carpentry business. He took up a homestead south of Cochrane. Robert had eight children. He died in 1923 at age 73, and his wife, Louise died in 1930 at age 76.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Big Hill Country, p. 240

Howard, Solomon

Solomon Howard, a building contractor, arrived in Banff in 1887.

2004 Addendum. Ref: SAPD membership application files.

Howe, Samuel

Samuel Howe arrived in the Bow River district in 1884. He was born at Nephi, Utah in 1865 and died in 1947. He married Emma McAbee in 1889 and after her death was married for the second time. Samuel first visited Alberta in 1882 with a herd of cattle. He returned to the United States and in 1884 he returned with Tom Lynch and 2700 head of cattle. He worked at the Bar U and later Oxley Ranches. He ranched in the Turner Valley area in 1888.

 

Howse, Joseph

Joseph Howse embarked at Gravesend, England in June, 1795. On August 31, 1795 at York Factory at age twenty-one. The next twenty years were spent trading and exploring for the Hudson's Bay Co. in Rupert's Land. He took an Indian wife and there were a number of children. Two boys; Henry and John, grew to adulthood. They were in Fort Victoria in 1864 with their families. A story that has been handed down tells of a river accident that took the life of the mother and two of the children, when the boat laden with supplies capsized. All of the Howse journals and papers were lost or burnt. The Hudson Bay has very little information. Joseph was Chief Factor of a number of Trading Posts including Chesterfield House (Empress, district of Alberta); North West Territories; Acton House (Rocky Mountain House), Carlton House, etc. He was appointed Councillor of Rupert's Land. He met David Thompson in 1809 on his way to the Columbia. A few years later David Thompson named the "Howse Pass" after him. He returned to England in 1815. The rivalry between the two fur companies was so acute it became actual warfare. His assistant J. Johnston was killed and his distaste for bloodshed caused him to resign from the Hudson's Bay Company. He published a grammar of Cree language in 1844.

 

Huckvale, Walter

Waiter Huckvale arrived in the Fort Macleod area in 1883 and on to Calgary in 1885. Waiter was born in 1861 at Oxford, England and died in 1937. He was married to Frances Jan Evans at Fort Macleod in 1898. Jane was born in 1876 at Bolton, Ontario and died in 1958 at Revelstoke, B.C. There were five children in the family; Eleanor, Walter, Charles, William and Margaret. Walter ranched at Fort Kipp. In 1894 he moved to Manyberries, and raised thoroughbred Herefords. In 1916 he moved to Medicine Hat where he was Mayor. He also served as President of the Red Cross and Western Stock Growers Association.

 

Huddlestun, William Wesley

Arrived in Alberta in 1883. He was born in 1862 in Florida. He died in 1937 at Twin Butte. He married Buie Graham Islay, who was born in 1865 at Duntroon, Ontario and died in 1925 at Twin Butte. There were four children: Frederick, Wesseno, Islay Marguerite, Georgie Graham. William came into Alberta with the second herd of cattle in 1883. He worked on various ranches, Waldrond, Garnett Bros., Duthie and Cochrane. His homestead was at Pine Creek in 1895.

 

Hudson, George Mills

George Hudson homesteaded at Etna, Alberta from 1889-1919. George was born in England in 1845 and died in 1939 at Everett, Washington. He married Elizabeth A. Robbins in 1869 in Utah. His second marriage was to Susan Alder in 1877. There were twenty-one children. George moved to Cardston, Alberta in 1911 and did carpentry.

 

Hudson, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth

Mary Hudson was born in Wales in 1835 and died at Calgary in 1920. She married John Sutton Hudson, who was born in England and died there in 1883. Mary came to Canada in 1884 to the land of opportunity for her family of nine. They were in Southern Alberta in 1884.

 

Huggard, James Stephen

James Huggard arrived in Calgary in 1885. He was born in Ireland and died in 1900 at Calgary. James was married to Jessie H. Aitken, who was born in England and died at Calgary in 1911. They had eight children. The Huggards homesteaded in the Beddington area.

 

Huggard, R.T.

Mr. Huggard who He was transferred from Winnipeg, Manitoba, was the inspector of weights and measures for the Calgary District.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Calgary, Her Industries & Resources, 1885.

Hughes, Albert

Albert Hughes came to Banff in 1887. He was born in England in 1850 and died at Medicine Hat in 1943. He married Annie Wallace in 1895 at Winnipeg, Manitoba. There were five children: Dorothy, Minto, Marie, Alberta, Hilda. Albert was a druggist and worked in Banff. He was in partnership with Dr. Brett. In 1889-1890, he moved to Medicine Hat and practiced pharmacy for two years. He went into ranching, raising horses on the 'Racehorse Ranch'.

 

Hughes, O.E.

Mr. O. E. Hughes was elected member for Electoral Division of Lorne in 1885.

2004 Addendum. Ref: 1885 Election Reports.

Hull, William Roper

W.R. Hull came to Calgary in 1884. He was born in 1856 in England and died in 1925 at Calgary. He was married in 1907 to Emmaline Mary Banister at Calgary. She was born in England in 1864 and died at Calgary in 1953. The Banisters came to Davisburg in 1884. William and his brother J. R. were engaged in raising cattle and horses. In 1884 he trailed 1200 head of horses to Calgary via Crowsnest Pass and again in 1886, 3000 head of cattle and 500 head of horses were brought to Alberta. He owned extensive properties, built the Grain Exchange Building and Hull Opera House. He was also a partner in the organization of the Calgary Brewing and Malting Company.

 

Humbury,

Mr. Humbury served with the NWMP as a scout in 1890.

2004 Addendum. Ref: A Centry of Memories.

Humphrey, Billie

Billie Humphrey was one of the Beaver Creek Polo players in 1888.

2004 Addendum. Ref: History of the Early Days of Pincher Creek p. 10 12.

Hunford, Jonas Jonson and Johann Bjornson

Jonas Hunford and his wife came from the US to the Hola district in 1880 and homesteaded NE 1/4 of Sec.16-37-2-W5M. He was born and educated in Iceland and wrote much of the history of the Hola district in his Icelandic Almanacs. In 1891 Jonas and his wife wer instrumental in establishing the library 'Idunn' Markerville and was librarian until his health failed. They had twelve children.

Merged with 2004 Addendum. Ref: History of Craig, Dickson, Happy Hill, Hola etc.

Hunt, Jos E.

Jos Hunt was recorded as a member of the Calgary Odd Fellows Lodge in 1889.

2004 Addendum.

Hunter, Adeline

Adeline Hunter homesteaded SW 1/4 of Sec.28- 34-1 W5M in July, 1888.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Olds First.

Hunter, William

William Hunter arrived in Calgary in 1883. He was born in Scotland in 1848 and died at Calgary in 1927. He was married in Scotland in 1875 to Elizabeth Lind who was born in Scotland and died in 1927 at Calgary. They had two children: George and Elizabeth.

 

Hutchings, Col.

Col. Hutchings homesteaded and later was involved in 1884 in the 44 Ranch in the Granum area in partnership with McKenzie & Mann, contractors of the C&E RR.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Granum by Rail.

Hutchings, Robert John

Robert Hutchings came to Calgary in 1885 from Winnipeg, Manitoba where he served his apprenticeship in the Saddlery business. Robert was born in 1866 at Newboro, Ontario and died in 1939 at Calgary. He was married at Calgary in 1892 to Anne Hunt, who was born in Ontario in 1865 and died in 1950 at Calgary. They had seven children in the family: John G., Douglas J., Marion, Stuart D., Harry R., George H., and Blanche. Established the business of Hutchings and Riley in 1899, which became Great West Saddlery. He served on numerous boards and was one of the founders of Western Canada College.

 

Hutchinson, Henry

Henry Hutchinson arrived at Lethbridge in 1884. He was born in 1852. He marred a widow, Mrs. Croddoch. Henry was an early saddle and harness maker in Lethbridge.

 

Hutchinson, Thomas

Thomas Hutchinson came to Medicine Hat around 1884 and opened the first saddle and harness shop in Medicine Hat.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Early History of Medicine Hat Country p. 38 40.

Hutchison, William Gibson & Helen (Nellie)

William Hutchison, born in Netherburn, Lanarkshire, Scotland June 7, 1852, married Helen Ralston Cochrane October 27, 1883 at Glasgow, Scotland. They came to Montreal, Quebec in 1884 and then went west to Calgary in 1887 and lived in the Mission district for two years. They homesteaded on Morley Trail SW 1/4 of Sec.22-24-3-W5M, but moved to Buffalo Lake in 1885 where he was the principal in the Buffalo Lake Trading Company. William and Nellie had three children: Helen who married Clem Gardner, Eunice who married William C. Robertson, and Joe who served overseas during WW1 and died there of appendicitis. William Sr. died April 19, 1902 in Lacombe and Mrs. Hutchison then married Frank Taylor and they resided at what is now the site of Camp Kiwanis. Mrs. Taylor died October 3, 1929 at Calgary.

2004 Addendum.

Hutton, William Osborn

William Hutton arrived in Lethbridge in 1886. Born in 1864 at Frontenac Co. Ontario, he married Mary Christina Gillison at Fort Macleod in 1893. She was born in 1870 at Amherst, N.S. William homesteaded near Eight Mile Lake; later took up mixed farming close to Lethbridge. He served as alderman and was active in civic affairs. There were eight children in the family; Bertha, Myrtle, Victoria, Etta, Eva, Jack, Cecil and Borden.

 

Hyde, Don Carlos

Don Carlos Hyde, born April 1, 1857 at Salt Lake City immigrated via wagon on the Fort Benton Trail to Alberta in 1890. He homesteaded 2.5 miles south of Cardston and did some freighting. In 1881 he married Sarah Anne Thomas who was born in October, 1857 at Lehi, Utah. They had five children born between 1882 and 1892. The family returned to the USA in 1919 after selling their property in Alberta. Mr. Hyde died in 1936 and Mrs. Hyde in 1946.

2004 Addendum. Ref: Hardwick Papers.

Hyde, Henry Ernest

Henry Hyde came to Pincher Creek in 1883. He was born at Strafford, Ontario in 1870 and died at Pincher Creek in 1933. He was married to Emma Chisholm who was born in 1865 and died at Pincher Creek in 1902. They had two children: John and Irene. Henry came west when he was nineteen years of age. He worked as a ranch hand for a few years and in 1884 established the first general store at Pincher Creek in partnership with J. H. Scofield. Henry Hyde was recorded as a member of the Masonic Lodge, Spitzie No. 6., instituted before 1890.

Merged with 2004 Addendum.

Hyssop, Charles

Mr. and Mrs. Hyssop and their sons Charles, William and Abraham came to Lethbridge in 1890. With the help of his sons, Charles obtained a water wagon and delivered water to homes in Lethbridge until 1903. Later the family engaged in ranching at Eight Mile Lake. Their brand was registered "5H".